Mise Tales Forty

For an update on what a Mise Tale is then please see Mise Tales One. As mentioned earlier on the front page of my website, any photos or cartoons, or short bits of information, when it is removed from the front page, will also be included again later in the next Misc Tales. That way you can keep track of it, search for it, or copy it.

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survival necklace s1401 from Cougar Fashion in Tahsis, British Columbia

from the rainforest, for the rainforest price $12.50 this necklace is transformed to emergency fishing gear within minutes. all you need is a pocket knife.

contents: – 3.8 m. fishing line  – 3.5 cm. bait hook – interlock snap swivel  – split ring  – 6 cm. hoochie

Now this is a unique West Coast piece. It is a very beautiful necklace and would draw comments wherever it is worn. dsc_6902I am not too sure how practical it would be with only 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of fishing line, but anything could work in an emergency.One would be better off also wearing a Survival Strap (get one in a matching colour) to add length to the necklace. Hey, two unique pieces of survival jewelry which you can wear anytime. Check out all the other items which you can find at Cougar Fashion

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The following is a most beautiful film of American lighthouses used as advertising for

Lerro Productions Photo Workshop Tours.

The Youtube page says:

While very popular, lighthouses are often overlooked as photographic subjects. Lighthouses were made to illuminate the night skies, so why not photograph them in their natural environment? Join us on our unique lighthouse tour adventures and learn how to photograph lighthouses in some of the most challenging conditions, both day and night.

Please watch in full screen mode – it is spectacular!

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Conimicut Point lighthouse off Warwick may become a place to stay for tourists from the Providence Journal April 09, 2014 by Barbara Polichetti, Journal Staff Writer bpoliche@providencejournal.com

0410_CONIMICUT_LIGHT_BEDBREAKFASTWARWICK, R.I. — For more than 100 years, the stout lighthouse off Conimicut Point has warned vessels away from rocky shallow waters, but soon its flashing white light might become a beacon of welcome. Mayor Scott Avedisian said Wednesday that a lighthouse aficionado who has already restored the Borden Flats lighthouse in Fall River and opened it as an inn, wants to do the same with the Conimicut light.   His restoration of the Fall River lighthouse can be seen on the websitewww.bordenflats.com.

[private] Avedisian said he will soon be asking the City Council to approve a 15-year lease with the New England Lighthouse Tourism and Restoration Company. The city would retain ownership of the lighthouse (which it obtained from the federal government in 2004) and the restoration company would be responsible for all repairs in return for being able to rent it out as an inn. The city would also still have access to the offshore lighthouse, which sits on a knob of rocks, and be able to use it for public tours or special events, he said. “This would be a great public-private partnership for us,” Avedisian said, adding that it fits well with the city’s ongoing efforts to market its coastal attractions such as the preservation of the former Rocky Point amusement park as state open space. The city began pursuing acquisition of the lighthouse in 2002 when Democratic Councilman Joseph Solomon, who represents the Conimicut area, learned that it had been declared a surplus property along with 38 others in New England. The city had hoped that federal dollars would allow it to restore the lighthouse, but the money never materialized. Solomon said Wednesday that he had not been briefed on the new proposal, but he always wanted the lighthouse preserved so it “could be open to the public and shared by future generations.” “There are a lot of people nationally and internationally that go to these lighthouses, so it’s a whole segment of the tourism industry that can be brought into our city,” he said. “I’m going to look at this with an open mind.” Nick Korstad, one of the partners in the restoration company, said he has been fascinated with lighthouses since he was a child growing up in Oregon. He said he thinks that the Conimicut light will be a good complement to the Borden Flats lighthouse in Fall River, which he has renovated and now runs as a seasonal inn. Rhode Island already has one lighthouse available for lodging: the Victorian-style beacon on Newport’s Rose Island. . Korstad said that since he and his partner do all the work themselves, the restoration at Conimicut will cost about $100,000, although it would be about eight times that if they had to hire the labor. He said that the Conimicut light, which is still a functioning lighthouse, is one of the few remaining examples of the caisson or “sparkplug” architectural style for lighthouses. And while the white building might look weather-beaten, Korstad said it is in very good shape. It is also fairly large inside for a lighthouse, with about 1,200 square feet of living space on several levels, he said. The original Conimicut lighthouse was built in 1868 but had to be torn down after the tower was heavily damaged by a spring ice floe in 1875. The current lighthouse was constructed in 1883, and its light was powered by kerosene. Korstad, 32, estimates that he has visited about 190 lighthouses in the United States and Canada and said he is committed to preserving the nautical buildings. His restoration of the Fall River lighthouse can be seen on the website www.bordenflats.com. 8 Avedisian said he will soon be asking the City Council to approve a 15-year lease with the New England Lighthouse Tourism and Restoration Company. The city would retain ownership of the lighthouse (which it obtained from the federal government in 2004) and the restoration company would be responsible for all repairs in return for being able to rent it out as an inn. The city would also still have access to the offshore lighthouse, which sits on a knob of rocks, and be able to use it for public tours or special events, he said. “This would be a great public-private partnership for us,” Avedisian said, adding that it fits well with the city’s ongoing efforts to market its coastal attractions such as the preservation of the former Rocky Point amusement park as state open space. The city began pursuing acquisition of the lighthouse in 2002 when Democratic Councilman Joseph Solomon, who represents the Conimicut area, learned that it had been declared a surplus property along with 38 others in New England. The city had hoped that federal dollars would allow it to restore the lighthouse, but the money never materialized. Solomon said Wednesday that he had not been briefed on the new proposal, but he always wanted the lighthouse preserved so it “could be open to the public and shared by future generations.” “There are a lot of people nationally and internationally that go to these lighthouses, so it’s a whole segment of the tourism industry that can be brought into our city,” he said. “I’m going to look at this with an open mind.” Nick Korstad, one of the partners in the restoration company, said he has been fascinated with lighthouses since he was a child growing up in Oregon. He said he thinks that the Conimicut light will be a good complement to the Borden Flats lighthouse in Fall River, which he has renovated and now runs as a seasonal inn. Rhode Island already has one lighthouse available for lodging: the Victorian-style beacon on Newport’s Rose Island. . Korstad said that since he and his partner do all the work themselves, the restoration at Conimicut will cost about $100,000, although it would be about eight times that if they had to hire the labor. He said that the Conimicut light, which is still a functioning lighthouse, is one of the few remaining examples of the caisson or “sparkplug” architectural style for lighthouses. And while the white building might look weather-beaten, Korstad said it is in very good shape. It is also fairly large inside for a lighthouse, with about 1,200 square feet of living space on several levels, he said. The original Conimicut lighthouse was built in 1868 but had to be torn down after the tower was heavily damaged by a spring ice floe in 1875. The current lighthouse was constructed in 1883, and its light was powered by kerosene. Korstad, 32, estimates that he has visited about 190 lighthouses in the United States and Canada and said he is committed to preserving the nautical buildings. His restoration of the Fall River lighthouse can be seen on the website www.bordenflats.com. [/private]

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A song by Neptune’s Car about the daily life and tasks of a lighthouse keeper (inspired by the stories of Abbie Burgess, Ida Lewis, and Katherine “Katie” Walker). See Youtube and Neptune’s Car and this page for the Lyrics – here or here.

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The following was downloaded from the Vintage Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) Facebook page here. On that page they said:

And now through the magic of Hollywood, we give you … the reason why we don’t let John McGrath drive CCG hovercraft any more.
Yes that’s really one of the CCG SAR hovercraft from Sea Island.
Yes that’s really the Sea Island OIC Capt McGrath driving.
Yes Jackie Chan really broke his ankle jumping from the bridge onto the hovercraft’s deck.

Hovercraft chase out of the Jackie Chan movie Rumble in the Bronx ….
It gives you a good idea about Hovercraft skirts as they transverse over different terrain.

This clip is for educational purposes, whether in-class lectures, online posting in a digital publication, or at conference presentations only as described in the following outline at :
http://www.wcl.american.edu/pijip/go/all copy rights to original source.

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 As you can see I have found another lighthouse photographer, 22 North Photography. As you can see by this screenshot I did a search on the site and came up with 363 images (of lighthouses!). Enjoy!

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The Little Red Lighthouse April 18, 2014 in Lighthouse Blog Category by Marilyn

Jeffreys-Hook-lighthouseLittle-Red-lighthouse-and-bridge

I’ve mentioned Marilyn Turk before. She writes a religious blog Pathways of the Heart based on everyday objects. I published a brief hint of another one of her stories  in Misc Tales Thirty-Nine earlier.

The little red lighthouse settled into its new home on Jeffrey’s Hook in the Hudson River. Built in 1880, it had been moved to the site when it was no longer needed in its former location in New Jersey. Jeffrey’s Hook was a rocky point of land that jutted out into the river near the city of New York and had long needed its own lighthouse. The little red lighthouse wasn’t  very big, at only forty feet high, but it was big enough for the location. It beamed its light out over the narrow channel between New York and New Jersey, warning traffic on the busy waterway of the dangers hidden below the water’s surface. . . more

[private]

For years, the lighthouse did its important job protecting the vessels that passed. But one day, men and equipment arrived and began to build a bridge nearby. In 1931, the huge George Washington Bridge loomed over the little lighthouse. The lights on the bridge dwarfed the lighthouse light, so in 1947, the lighthouse was decommissioned and abandoned. No longer did a keeper come to light the beam of the lighthouse. No longer did the lighthouse serve a purpose. It was too small, too unimportant and soon forgotten. Except for a children’s book written in 1942 called The Little Red Lighthouse and The Great Gray Bridge, the lighthouse would have disappeared into history. But when in 1951, plans for its demolition were announced, thousands of the book’s fans started a national campaign to save the lighthouse. Thanks to their efforts, ownership of the lighthouse was transferred from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. The Little Red Lighthouse is now Manhattan’s only remaining lighthouse and an important feature of George Washington Park at the foot of the bridge. Visitors can climb the stairs to the top of the tower where the lantern room is again fitted with a working lens that blinks proudly at cargo barges and passenger ships sailing under the George Washington Bridge. Sometimes people can feel too small and too insignificant like the Little Red Lighthouse. But God knows where we are, He hasn’t forgotten us, and He cares. “Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care. And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.” Matthew 10:29-31 In fact, you are worth so much that He sent his son to let you know how much. “For God so loved the world, He gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not die, but have eternal life.” John 3:16 [/private]

 

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