Art – Bill Maximick Paintings

On my old website I made many friends in the art community. One of my favourites was Bill Maximick from whom I purchased a print of his painting Queen of the North. It is a beautiful painting of a beautiful ship which once plied our BC coastal waters from Vancouver to Prince Rupert on the Inside Passage.

“Many West Coast artists specialize in painting with seascapes and marine themes, but few match the public acceptance and acclaim accorded Bill Maximick, particularly from those who know and appreciate boats.”

 

“Bill’s experience of working many years on tugs, fish boats, and in remote logging camps on British Columbia’s west coast impart powerful feeling and authenticity to his paintings.”

 

One can feel the power of the sea, and see the beauty of the boats in his paintings. But Bill did not only paint boats, and seascapes – he painted BC lighthouses. Some examples are seen in the album below. To see more paintings, and other services he offers, go to his website – Maximick Originals.

 

 

 

 

What Plane Is That?

Back on November 21st of this year I wrote What Ship Is That? to show people how to find out the location of their favourite ship as seen from a lighthouse, a home overlooking the water, or a sightseer on a hilltop. I would have loved to have had something like that on the lighthouses when I was there.

One other thing that always got our attention, especially at night, was the flickering lights of aircraft passing overhead. Many a time I wondered where the plane was coming from, or where it was going. You see, at the time, we ran an aircraft non-directional radio beacon which the planes used for navigation. It was more a check than actual navigation, but they did use it because they passed right over the top of us on the lighthouse, albeit at 30,000 feet! Continue reading

Why We Need MORE Lighthouses in British Columbia

One of the arguments for destaffing the lighthouses in British Columbia (BC), Canada is that they are no longer needed because all vessels have the Global Positioning System (GPS). Canadian mariners must move into the 21st Century they say!

Have you ever looked at British Columbia? The size of British Columbia?

Note the three roads to Vancouver, Bella Bella, and Prince Rupert

British Columbia is the westernmost province of Canada, bordered by the Pacific Ocean. With an area of 944,735 square kilometers (364,764 sq mi) it is Canada’s third-largest province. The province itself is eleven times the size of Austria, where I live; nearly four times the size of Great Britain, two and one-half times larger than Japan and larger than every U.S. state except Alaska. 1 Continue reading

Lighthouse Collections – Lapel Pins

CCG crest as lapel pin

One of the benefits of having a “glamorous” job like a policeman, pilot, or lighthouse keeper is the collection of memorabilia such as models, photos, key-chain hangers, and lapel pins. This post is dedicated to lapel pins.

In the photos below you can see some of the pins that were collected by myself and my son over many years. From the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) we have helicopters and ships (CCGS) and hovercraft as well as crests. We also worked in close co-ordination with Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) and Coast Guard Radio. Continue reading

Do You Remember This Aircraft?

Dehavilland Beaver DHC-2

A friend sent me this Youtube link about the Dehavilland Beaver in an email and it brought back lots of memories of the British Columbia coast. This is the “Beaver Ballad” performed by the Fretless Bar Girls.

What does a seaplane have to do with lighthouses?

In the days before helicopters many of these DeHavilland Beavers landed at lighthouses with supplies and mail, or were used to ferry lighthouse keepers and their families to and from the nearest town to a major center for their holidays. Continue reading