Mise Tales Twenty-Four

 

For an update on what a Mise Tale is then please see Mise Tales One.

August 07, 2013 – August 7th every year is National lighthouse Day! Please mark it on your calendars so that you can track events next year. Yes, I know, I missed it too! SorrY! 

National Lighthouse Day not only commemorates the 1789 act but honors and celebrates the lighthouse – a beacon of light that symbolizes safety and security for ships at sea. – from blog.calendars.com

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Torn paper ArtTorn Paper Collage Art of Beaches & Sea

Interesting way of creating art – cheap, and very creative!

Massachusetts artist Wanda Edward puts little pieces of paper together to create unique torn paper collage art of beaches and sea. I can’t stop looking at the collages! They are simply magnificent! Similar to a mosaic, torn paper collage art is a composition of small segments. Wanda uses bits of handmade and hand-painted papers, rice paper, book pages, and maps. “The papers are given a pattern and color in advance, but once the piece begins, it relies solely on the colors of the paper,” Wanda says. “You look at the large image first, then you move into the many other layers that create that image.” So take a close look! There’s lots to discover.

Buy Torn paper Collage Art at Ocean Offerings, and other selected stores and galleries listed on Artist Website. Continue reading

Tides

photo Paul Kurbis

One of the reasons for the establishment of a lighthouse is to mark the dangers from the effect of extreme tides (low and high) on surrounding lands, islands, waterways, and beaches. 

Look at the photo on the left of my old lighthouse at McInnes Island at low tide (click for a larger version). We can tell it is low tide because the kelp is exposed on the rocks, and the high tide mark on the rocks is marked by a dirty black line. Here on the Pacific Coast of Canada, the tides come in and go out twice a day, and the range is between seventeen (17) and twenty-one (21) feet (6 to 7 meters)!

Note the small rock at dead center, bottom of the photo. At high tide that would be covered and become a menace to navigation. In this case this is not a marked shipping channel so no marker is necessary. The reason for the lighthouse (visible on the left of the large island) is that it was listed as a landfall light. A marker for ships coming in from the Pacific Ocean to the British Columbia coastline, and also a marker for the entrance to Milbanke Sound. It really doesn’t mark the island as dangerous; just an indicator of a mariner’s location on the ocean.

Example of a floating dock

To return to a docked boat on the BC coast after a few hours of sightseeing or shopping is sometimes a surprise for many tourists. The docks for the boats are built to float up and down on fixed pilings to accommodate the 21 foot tides (see photo left). To get onto the dock you walk up or down a ramp. A roller on the lower end rolls along the dock as the tide rises or falls. The top part of the ramp is hinged.

The tides change approximately every six hours, so if you left your boat and walked up the steep ramp to the topside dock at 10 AM (low tide) and came back at 2 PM (4 hours difference), the ramp would be almost horizontal (high tide). If you had lots of heavy groceries to move it was always a good idea to plan at what time of day you wanted to move them! Continue reading

Reprint – Photo Gallery: Sutton Bridge Lighthouse Renovation Restores View Which Inspired Sir Peter Scott

Work continues on the Peter Scott Lighthouse near Sutton Bridge - owners Sue and Doug Hilton. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Photo gallery: Sutton Bridge lighthouse renovation restores view which inspired Sir Peter Scott

By DAISY WALLAGE Monday, July 30, 2012
– with permission from EDP24 online

With an endless sky, tantalising glimpses of the The Wash and wildfowl flying overhead, this stunning, sometimes lonely view was lost for decades as time took its toll on east bank lighthouse at Sutton Bridge.

Now, after months of loving restoration, visitors can finally climb to the top and bask in the uninterrupted views that so inspired the artist and conservation pioneer Sir Peter Scott more than 70 years ago.

The view from the top. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Owners Sue and Doug Hilton bought the lighthouse, on the mouth of the River Nene, in November 2010 and are steadily achieving their goal of opening a museum and visitor centre at the site as well as restoring the landmark tower itself.

New, locally crafted steel handrails on the lighthouse stairs will allow visitors to explore beyond Sir Peter’s living room to his second floor bedroom and the lamp room during a series of open weekends next month. Continue reading

Three More Lighthouses Saved! Sadly not Canadian

New status shines light on landmark from UK News Guardian

Published on Thursday 10 May 2012 09:29

A coastal landmark on the borough coastline has been declared a listed building to help preserve it for future generations.

St Mary's lighthouse

St Mary’s Lighthouse, a popular destination for sightseers and school trips, has been given grade II-listed status by English Heritage.

The 19th century tower and adjoining cottages host more than 80,000 visitors a year.

Officials at English Heritage decided to list the lighthouse, keeper’s and fishermen’s cottages because of their historic and architectural interest.

A spokesperson for English Heritage said: “The late 19th century lighthouse and associated cottages have been designated at grade II. More ->

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Books – Chance Brothers – Early Suppliers of Equipment for Canadian Lighthouses

Chance Brothers – Early Suppliers of Equipment for Canadian Lighthouses 

The graphic to the left appeared on The Lighthouse Society of Great Britain (LSGB) website.

After much Googling for it I finally found “With regret, this website has been closed.” The information below is printed with permission of Dr. Ken Tretheway. 

Dr. Trethewy’s site had all the data from this book on line in PDF files which I am going to host here as they are priceless documents showing the inner workings of older British and Canadian lighthouses. 

The available PDF file, A Few Notes on Modern Lighthouse Practice, can be read, saved, and downloaded from this link (2.45 MB).

The drawings in the gallery below are all referred to in the PDF book but are not reproduced therein.  Continue reading

Book – 1855 Lights for Lighthouses

This book first published in 1855 is a copy of the original produced by the Chance Brothers factory. From the handwritten prices and information, it appears to be a salesman’s copy which would have been given to the prospective buyer. As each light was specifically made for one location only, then this would have been a one-of-a-kind catalogue. 

Download the complete book here in PDF format 22.5 MBs (60+ pages) – right click the link for more options)

If you wish to print the book, this scanned version size was 8.5″ x 11″ (21.5 x 28 cms.) 

Could the UK lighthouses be about to go in the dark?

From the BBC online news 

(NOTE: This is an image from the website. If the text is too small, hold down the CTRL key (lower left) on your keyboard and rotate the middle wheel on your mouse. The text will become larger or smaller depending on which direction you move the mouse wheel.) This applies to all websites and sites on the Internet.)

 

 

 

Book – Chance Brothers Diaphone Manual

Chance Diaphone Book

 

This is a PDF copy of the Chance Diaphone Manual, which explains all the workings of the Diaphone Foghorn, and lists the many versions of the foghorn, their ranges, working pressures, sizes, etc. Click the link above to read or download the book.