Mise Tales Forty-One

For an update on what a Mise Tale is then please see Mise Tales One. As mentioned earlier on the front page of my website, any photos or cartoons, or short bits of information, when it is removed from the front page, will also be included again later in the next Misc Tales. That way you can keep track of it, search for it, or copy it.

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Aaron Priest Photography Photo Keywords  lighthouseSome beautiful night-time photos of lighthouses, some in a 360º panorama format from Aaron D. Priest on his website aaronpriestphoto.com.

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Mise Tales Thirty-Eight

 

For an update on what a Mise Tale is then please see Mise Tales One.

As mentioned earlier on the front page of my website, any photos or cartoons, or short information will also be included again later in the next Misc Tales when it is removed from the front page. That way you can keep track of it, or copy it.

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MoonFarolCaboEspichel-netLovely night sky photographs including a couple with  lighthouses, all by Miguel Claro.

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Canadian WatershedsAn excellent interactive article on Explore Canada’s ocean watersheds from Canadian Geographic. It shows how dependent we all are on our water supplies – from source to oceans. Keep them clean!

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A song sent to me on Facebook by my cousin. Lyrics are here.

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CN-8839-6018-8808-mile-22.7-PARRY-SOUND-SUB-092608Two things I love best – lighthouses and trains!

From the site Railpictures.ca – CN 8839 with the 6018 and 8808 lead a northbound train at mile 22.7 on the CP’s Parry Sound Sub September 26, 2008

Once Upon a Foggy Night . . .

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There is a boat out there . . . click the button below . . .

Imagine you are a lighthouse keeper on the graveyard shift on a foggy night. All you hear are the diesel engines running, the foghorn blowing at intervals. As you stare out into the gloomy mist you hear this sound. It is a boat, but what kind of boat? What kind of motor?

Many old-timers will recognize it as the sound of a classic make and break Easthope 2-stroke marine gasoline engine on idle. It probably belonged to a fisherman waiting out the fog so he could see where he was going. It was a sound that carried through the fog just like the foghorn.

To hear it again brings back many memories. If you wish to see the fishboat that housed this engine take a look at this Youtube page.

EasthopeMarineSign

 

 

 

Mise Tales Thirty-Six

 

For an update on what a Mise Tale is then please see Mise Tales One.

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Here is a great video taken on board the Coast Guard ship CCGS Sir Wilfred Laurier as it services the mountain-top radio sites using the onboard helicopter. Great shots of the Queen Charlotte Islands (Haida Gwai) and the old lighthouse and radio station at Cape St. James.

It is titled on Youtube as the “Big Red Restaurant“!

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Night Photos and the Lighthouse

In August 2012 I published an article Lighthouse Under the Stars. Since then I have been very lucky to find night-time photos with  the stars and a lighthouse – not necessarily a Canadian lighthouse, but a lighthouse nonetheless. 

The first two are from Mike Salway who has given me permission to reprint them here. Please drop by and bookmark his page – some wonderful nighttime photography there.

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The Milky Way over Cape Leveque Lighthouse, Australia. Image credit: Mike Salway.

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Northern Lights at the Lighthouse

 

In my twenty-five (25) years on McInnes Island one of the most spectacular sights in the winter was the Northern Lights display (aurora borealis1) in the northern night time sky. Absolutely beautiful!

This was brought to mind the other day when I saw this October 10, 2012 article online Image: Aurora Dips South Across Canada

The aurora borealis was photographed from space over Montreal and Lake Superior on Oct. 08, 2012. CREDIT: NASA Earth Observatory

When a powerful solar flare, known as a coronal mass ejection, hit Earth’s magnetic field on Oct. 8, people living in North America’s northern latitudes were treated to a spectacular light show.

This visible light image from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite shows the northern lights swirling across Canada’s Quebec and Ontario provinces. The city lights of Montreal also shine in the bottom of the image.

Source:Image: Aurora Dips South Across Canada by   www.livescience.com Continue reading

A Lighthouse at Night

 

One of the nicest things about night shift on McInnes Island lighthouse was observing the sky on a clear night. It was always the same, and always different.

The same stars were always there, but the moon waxed and waned, comets streaked across at intervals, sometimes an airplane’s navigation lights blinked in the south, or sometimes the Northern Lights flashed in the north. Below are some more shots.

One of the problems with seeing such sights in the city is the city lights, often called light pollution. The graphic below ill show you what is seen and not seen as light pollution decreases.

I must confess, that is what the night sky looks like at night from a lighthouse, but not having a photo from my experiences on McInnes lighthouse as my camera was too amateurish for such detail, I added the lighthouse silhouette to the photos from the gallery below. Are the photos below fantastic or not?

 

But, when looking at the full-sized photo at the top, turn off your lights and imagine what it was like. Sometimes we would take a foam mat and lay down on the helicopter pad and just watch the night sky. It was fascinating. For meteor showers and comets it was unbeatable. Continue reading

What Plane Is That?

Back on November 21st of this year I wrote What Ship Is That? to show people how to find out the location of their favourite ship as seen from a lighthouse, a home overlooking the water, or a sightseer on a hilltop. I would have loved to have had something like that on the lighthouses when I was there.

One other thing that always got our attention, especially at night, was the flickering lights of aircraft passing overhead. Many a time I wondered where the plane was coming from, or where it was going. You see, at the time, we ran an aircraft non-directional radio beacon which the planes used for navigation. It was more a check than actual navigation, but they did use it because they passed right over the top of us on the lighthouse, albeit at 30,000 feet! Continue reading